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Anthony Nguyen
Anthony Nguyen

Where To Buy Hardiplank Siding



Jaime Venzor has been in the siding business for more than 15 years. He started out installing mostly vinyl, but now 80 percent of his work is fiber cement. He earned his good reputation with his customers by doing things the right way, and he earned our thanks by sharing some of his knowledge with us. So read on and learn what Jaime thinks are the most important tips.




where to buy hardiplank siding



Find your most beat-up pieces of siding and rip them down into 1-1/4-in. starter strips. These strips, installed at the bottom, will make your first row of siding angle out to match the rest of the rows. Snap a line 1 in. above the bottom of the wall sheathing as a guide. Install these fragile starter strips with a 15-gauge trim gun. Snap another line for the bottom row of siding, positioning it so it will hang down an additional 1/4 in. from the starter.


Predrill and nail the frieze boards, driving two galvanized box nails into each stud. Hold the nails at least 3/4 in. from the edges. Drive the nailheads snug with the surface of the siding. Do not overdrive them. Apply caulk at the corner lap joint before installing the second piece.


Cut the frieze board to length (Photo 3). Fiberboard cement siding is highly abrasive. Even a carbide tooth blade will last for only part of the day. At home centers, you can buy diamond blades made specifically for cutting fiber cement. These blades cut quickly and create less dust. But we had success with a less expensive dry-cut, diamond masonry blade. Drill cutouts for electrical boxes and pipes with regular twist bits or spade bits, and make interior or even curved cuts with a jigsaw fitted with a tungsten or carbide grit blade (these blades are available at home centers and tile stores). Cutting fiberglass cement siding raises a lot of silica dust, so work outside and wear a dust mask.


Nail a 3/8-in. treated starter strip along the bottom of the wall. Then cut and nail the first course of siding along the layout line. Leave a 1/8-in. gap at the end, and nail at each stud with a single 8d galvanized box nail held 1 in. down from the top edge.


Rip and nail up a 3/8-in. thick treated wood starter strip along the bottom of the wall (above the foundation). This strip will tip the first piece of siding to the proper angle. Measure and cut to length the first piece of siding and nail it in place (Photo 7).


Pros use pneumatic coil nailers (you can rent one) designed specifically for fiberboard cement siding. They cut nailing time in half. If you go this route, practice first to make sure the nailheads will be set flush.


Cut a straight 12 so its length runs from the frieze board to the bottom of the first siding course. Measure up from the bottom of the story pole to mark the full width of the first course of siding. Remember, this mark represents the top of the siding piece, not the bottom of the second course.


From this point, make marks up the pole at the recommended exposure for your siding. The top course should be at least two-thirds the width of the lower courses. Check your layout marks against window and door openings and other features around the house, and adjust the exposure to avoid having to rip narrow pieces.


When the final layout is OK, draw heavy lines on the face and both edges of the story pole using a square. Now hold the story pole tight against the frieze board at all corners and alongside windows and doors. Transfer the layout marks to the wall and snap chalk lines. This will ensure that all the siding courses go on straight and uniformly.


Prefinished fiberglass cement siding boards come with a protective plastic coating. To protect the paint from getting scratched during installation, leave the plastic on and make your cuts right through it. Peel away the plastic after the board has been fastened to the wall.


We decided to use a prefinished product in this story, but the other way to go is simple primed siding. That material is primed and ready for you to paint. Here are some facts to consider when making your decision.


Every time you cut a plank, you create an exposed surface that has no primer or paint to protect it from the elements. If a cut edge is going to butt up against a corner post or trim board, it gets caulked. If the cut edge is part of a butt joint in the middle of the wall, it needs to be painted (try to use factory edges on all butt joints). Planks that have been cut to fit over windows and doors also need paint. Order paint kits and caulking to match both the trim and the siding colors. Your siding supplier should have access to both.


Hold the siding snug under the windowsill and mark the window edge location. Then measure from the chalk line to the top of the siding. Add 1/8 in. to your measurement. This is the width of the cutout.


Cut out the notch with your saw and slide the piece into place, leaving a 1/8-in. gap between the siding and windowsill. Caulk this gap later. Predrill and nail at each stud, including under the window.


Notch to go around windows and doors. Be sure to allow a 1/8-in. gap where the siding meets the window trim and sill. This joint will be caulked later. Nail the top edge of the siding along the windowsill at each stud. These nailheads will be exposed, but the paint will cover them.


Notch to go around windows and doors (Photos 8 and 9). Be sure to allow a 1/8-in. gap where the siding meets the window trim and sill. This joint will be caulked later. Nail the top edge of the siding along the windowsill at each stud. These nailheads will be exposed, but the paint will cover them.


Buy the siding already primed. If you prime it yourself, use an alkali resistant primer. Caulk all the joints with an acrylic latex caulk before applying the final coats of paint. Be sure the caulk fills the 1/8-in. joint completely to keep it watertight. Finish-coat with a 100 percent acrylic latex paint.


If you live in a region of high rainfall or the wall is highly exposed to water, slip a 3-in. wide strip of building paper behind butt joints. Be sure the bottom edge of the paper laps on top of the lower course of siding.


Actually, Hardie siding is nearly five times thicker than vinyl siding and weighs almost two and a half pounds per square foot. Although the thickness of Hardie boards makes them exceptionally durable, it also makes them extremely cumbersome to install.


Rather than spending hours trying to find the best materials to purchase for your installation, hire a professional contractor. They already have tried-and-true supplies on hand, so you can rest assured your new siding boards are well supported with quality products.


The 5/8-inch thickness and unique features of Artisan siding provide a precise fit and finish as well as the freedom to miter corners for attractive, streamlined styling. Artisan Shiplap siding delivers distinct lines that closely replicate traditional cedar siding to bring authenticity to any home. The James Hardie Artisan collection is for those with impeccable taste. Offering gorgeous, deep shadow lines and extra thick boards, Artisan lap siding and trim will set your home apart.


The 5/8-inch thickness and unique features of Artisan siding provide a precise fit and finish as well as the freedom to miter corners for attractive, streamlined styling. Artisan Shiplap siding delivers distinct lines that closely replicate traditional cedar siding to bring authenticity to any home.


As America's #1 brand of siding, James Hardie fiber cement siding and trim bring beautiful design and superior performance to homes from coast to coast. In addition to the warm, natural character of wood and the extreme durability of fiber cement, James Hardie siding is available in a variety of looks and textures and comes with baked-on ColorPlus Technology for a lasting finish or primed for paint. Plus, James Hardie siding products are Engineered for Climate, meaning they offer specific performance attributes relative to your climate.


The average cost to reside a 1,500 sq.ft. house with Hardie siding is $12,000-18,000. In lower income areas, homeowners may pay less to install Hardie Board siding, around $10,000-14,500 for the same size house.


Hardie Board siding costs $7 to 13 per square foot installed. This price includes all materials and installation. Putting up Hardie Board siding on a 2,000 sq.ft. house costs $14,000-26,000.


Moreover, depending on your desired siding board exposure and color, material prices for James Hardie will vary significantly. Also, keep in mind that you need to include the cost of trim, be it wood or PVC / AZEK trim board. We will discuss trim prices below.


This includes the cost of the siding boards, stainless steel nails, trim (at least $1 -2 per 1 square foot of the job size), house wrap (underlayment/vapor barrier) and any other materials needed for the install.


Lets take a closer look at how the cost of Hardie Board siding stacks up against its competitors: vinyl siding, other popular fiber cement siding brands, such as Allura, engineered wood siding, real cedar wood siding, and stucco.


When it comes to the cost of siding installation most pros charge 2 to 3 times the cost of materials for a particular job. Thus, a quote from a siding pro includes all materials, labor, overhead and profit in one final price.


Keep in mind that your location can have a big impact on labor charges. Depending on where you live, local siding installers will have various labor rates. High income areas such as big cities in the Northeast and California will have the highest contractor fees. 041b061a72


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